Thursday, 22 September 2016

Days Out in Yorkshire with Yorkshire Water: Haworth Moor

Yorkshire-Water-Haworth-Moor

The Bronte sisters and I have been longtime companions, my favourite book is Wuthering Heights and has been since I first read it aged 16 over 35 years ago. My degree thesis at uni was titled "Gender Roles in the Novels of the Bronte Sisters," and my eldest daughter boasts two of their names as her own. Not a third though because that might be considered overkill.
So when Yorkshire Water invited us to explore some of the 72,000 acres of land the company owns across Yorkshire as part of the new Enjoying the Land campaign, it seemed entirely appropriate to take up their challenge by walking the same paths that the Brontes walked across Haworth Moor.


Yorkshire-Water-reservoir-walks

As part of Enjoying the Land, Yorkshire Water has produced a free outdoor adventure pack  and a series of four free reservoir walk packs covering walks around Yorkshire Water reservoirs set in stunning Yorkshire landscape and through the county's national parks.
The walks are ranked from a one boot gentle stroll to four boots for the more intrepid adventurer. The Haworth Moor walk is ranked as a four boot walk for the experienced rambler. We are not experienced ramblers but we did it anyway, at least most of it.

Haworth-Moor

The 4.8mile Haworth Moor walk is to the south west of the Bronte's famous home village through Penistone Country Park and passing Low Laithe reservoir going on towards the Bronte Falls and the ruined farmhouse Top Withens, believed to be the inspiration behind Cathy and Heathcliff's childhood home in Wuthering Heights.

Haworth-Moor

It's a walk that starts gently enough meandering high along the moors and giving stunning views of a Yorkshire that was, thankfully, bathed in sunshine.

Yorkshire-Water-reservoir-walks


Yorkshire-Water-reservoir-walks


Haworth-Moor-Penistone-Country-Park


Yorkshire-Water-reservoir-walks

But nearing the Bronte Falls, the ground underfoot can be wet and slippy, even in hot sunshine and the gradients get steeper.

Yorkshire-Water-Reservoir-Walks

But we forged on to Bronte Falls. After all, if Charlotte Bronte could make it to the falls, in the depths of November, after the snow, and wearing a dress: So could we in sneakers and jeans.

From Charlotte's letters, November 29 1854: 

When we got half a mile on the moors, Arthur suggested the idea of the waterfall; after the melted snow he said it would be fine. I had often wished to see it in it's winter power, so we walked on. It was fine indeed; a perfect torrent racing over the rocks, white and beautiful.

The-Bronte-Falls

Not so torrential this September but a faint trickle after a dryish summer. Still a beautiful spot nestling in a valley with the Bronte Bridge leading over the tumbling, rock filled stream towards the steep climb to Top Withens.

Yorkshire-Water-Haworth-Moor

Yorkshire-Water-Reservoir-Walks


We didn't go on up the hill though, we rested and picnicked and enjoyed the sun and the gurgle of the stream before turning back the way we had come, leaving Top Withens for another day and better boots. The one when I can do my very best Kate Bush impression without disturbing the tourists.

And that's the delight of Yorkshire Water walks, they're free so you don't feel compelled to do more than you need to do in the time you want to do it, and they're open all year round, so you can do it when you want to too.

And we'll be back to see the Bronte Falls in full flow, just as soon as I find a crinoline.




Yorkshire Water has a vast range of free outdoor activities, not just walks, but cycling routes, pony trekking, fishing, and sailing. Parking is also free. So get out there and start Enjoying the Land.






This post is in collaboration with Yorkshire Water but all words and opinions are my own.


8 comments :

  1. Yorkshire is such a beautiful county (although it is the wrong coloured Rose - I was born in Lancs.).

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  2. I love how you linked the Bronte sisters' experiences to yours. Wuthering Height was my favourite as a teen too. The scenery on your walk is spectacular.#CountryKids

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  3. I'm a Bronte fan too. I prefer her over Austen. Had a chance to visit Haworth more than a couple of years ago. It was early Winter and the weather wasn't good, so we weren't able to do the walks. Would love to be able to visit again and this time do the walks and see the Bronte falls. Your photos are absolutely stunning! #countrykids

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  4. We visited Yorkshire in May, after a dry spring, so not surprised to hear the waterfall was only a trickle. I'm sure autumn will make up for it! Might be a little wet for a crinoline however.... #countrykids

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  5. Haworth is somewhere I visited a lot in my childhood as we have family in Yorkshire. It's such a lovely place. I can't remember walking in the moors here but it looks beautiful #countrykids

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  6. What beautiful photos, It is a party of the country I know so little about and yet it looks strangely like the Cornish Moorland too. The paths and trails look really well trodden and I love the idea of the boots to tell you how hard they will be. Now I want to go and read Wuthering Heights again and visit Yorkshire.

    Thank you for sharing your explore on #CountryKids

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  7. Wow what a beautiful place! I have heard and seen photos of Yorshire but never this intimate. Thanks for sharing your trip and love how its connected with literature =) #countrykids

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  8. I now have Kate Bush ear worm after reading this.I can see now why the Bronte sisters loved writing about this area so much, the views just compel you to write about them.

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